Tag Archives: recipe

Rosemary-Garlic Rubbed Pork Roast

Garlic & rosemary join forces to make your pork loin even more delicious. You will find yourself “hogging” this tasty dish.


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Check out the video recipe here

Rosemary-Garlic Rubbed Pork Roast

Prep: 15 minutes plus standing
Roast: 1 hour 15 minutes • Serves: 8

               Nonstick cooking spray

1            package (2/3 ounce) fresh rosemary, leaves removed and coarsely chopped (about 3 tablespoons)

5            medium garlic cloves, finely chopped

2            tablespoons Dijon mustard

1            tablespoon honey

1            tablespoon olive oil

1½        teaspoons kosher salt

1½        teaspoons fresh ground black pepper

1            (3-pound) tied boneless pork loin roast

1. Preheat oven to 450°. Line 13 x 9-inch roasting pan with aluminum foil; spray with nonstick cooking spray. In small bowl, combine remaining ingredients except pork. Rub pork with garlic mixture and place in prepared pan.

2. Roast pork 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350° and roast 1 hour to 1 hour 10 minutes longer or until internal temperature reaches 140°. Transfer pork to cutting board and let stand 15 minutes before slicing (temperature will rise to 145°).

Approximate nutritional values per serving: 180 Calories, 8g Fat (2g Saturated), 58mg Cholesterol, 305mg Sodium, 4g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 23g Protein

Chef Tip

A boneless pork loin roast is made from two pork loins that have been tied together with kitchen string.

Turkey Bacon

Fitting Bacon into Your Diet

Turkey bacon

From breakfast to burgers, maple doughnuts to bacon-wrapped just about anything…seems like there’s no shortage of opportunities to tantalize your taste buds with those savory, crispy, and greasy strips of BACON! But should you indulge? Will each bite of that chocolate-covered bacon effectively remove five years from your life expectancy? Is bacon a secret conspiracy to control the masses? Can bacon be enjoyed, like most any indulgence, in moderation (spoiler alert, it’s this one)?

Perhaps the biggest concern with bacon is the association between nitrite intake and cancer. Nitrites in cured meats like bacon, ham, pastrami, or hot dogs preserve flavor, give them an appealing pink color, and prevent bacterial growth. All good things. It gets complicated, however, when those nitrites are converted into nitrosamines, a potent carcinogen. Nitrosamines are formed when amines (part of protein) react with the nitrites used to cure the bacon. That reaction happens more readily at high heat (cue frying bacon sound). That’s why, of all the processed meats, bacon gets such a bad rap. Bacon is generally cooked at higher temperatures so often has higher levels of nitrosamines.

What about uncured bacons? You’ll see them on the shelves touting, “no nitrites added” or, “all natural.” Unfortunately they’re not the answer to our cured meat woes. Most of these products use celery powder. Celery is rich in nitrates (that’s nitrate with an A). To act as a preservative, however, the nitrates in the celery are converted to nitrites before being used to cure bacon. Nitrites from celery seem to form nitrosamines just as readily as sodium nitrite added to conventional bacons. There are truly nitrite-free bacons, however (read on for our recommendation). As for turkey bacon, we’ll be pitting the various bacon options in an epic cage match for breakfast domination on social media later this week.

What about USDA regulations? One glimmer of sunlight in the bleak nitrite storm engulfing bacon are the regulations imposed by the USDA, not only limiting the amount of nitrite that can be added to bacon but also requiring that certain curing methods more prone to nitrosamine formation also contain sodium ascorbate or sodium erythorbate (antioxidants shown to limit the formation of nitrosamines). Limit but not eliminate. And the effects may not apply to other carcinogenic byproducts of nitrites like notrosyl-haem. USDA regulations help, but they don’t completely eliminate the risk.

What’s to be done? Let’s put things in perspective. Eating two strips of bacon daily has been shown to increase the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by about eighteen percent. Cut that to two strips a week and your risk becomes much much smaller. Combine it with a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables and your risk virtually disappears (studies have found those with low fruit and vegetable intake have the highest risk). You can also reduce the formation of nitrosamines by cooking your bacon at low temperatures (under 300° is ideal) for longer (may take up to twenty minutes on the stovetop for those crispy strips). Microwaving is also a good option that produces few nitrosamines and can speed up the cooking time to about five minutes.

Still worried about nitrites? Truly nitrite-free bacon is available in your butcher block. Try Daily’s natural bacon with no added sodium nitrite or celery powder. The bacon has a slightly grey cast but don’t let that scare you, it’s one of the most delicious bacons you’ll ever eat. Plus, the grey color is how you know it’s truly nitrite-free. You can also swap bacon for sausage (which are typically nitrite free) at some meals (vegetarian breakfast “meats” are also a great option with the added benefit of less fat and sodium).

Grilled Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

These grilled stuffed chiles are a delicious way to take advantage of the Hatch Chile Season!

Check out the video recipe here!

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Grilled Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

Prep: 20 minutes • Grill: 5 minutes • Serves: 8

1            tablespoon olive oil

1            garlic clove, minced

¼           cup panko breadcrumbs

¼           cup raw unsalted pepitas

1            tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

½           teaspoon ancho chili powder

1            green onion, thinly sliced

½           cup cream cheese, softened

1/3       cup shredded Cheddar cheese

¼           cup fresh or frozen corn kernels

3            tablespoons chèvre

2            tablespoons fresh lime juice

4            large or 8 small Anaheim or Hatch chile peppers, halved lengthwise and seeded

1. Prepare outdoor grill for direct grilling over medium-high heat. In large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat; add garlic, breadcrumbs and pepitas, and cook 2 minutes or until lightly toasted. Remove from heat; stir in cilantro and chili powder.

2. In small bowl, stir onion, cream cheese, Cheddar cheese, corn, chèvre and lime juice; transfer to small zip-top plastic bag and snip off bottom corner of bag. Fill pepper halves with cheese mixture; sprinkle with pepita mixture.

3. Place peppers, skin side down, on hot grill rack; cover and cook 5 minutes or until grill marks appear and cheese melts.

Approximate nutritional values per serving: 152 Calories, 11g Fat (5g Saturated), 23mg Cholesterol, 102mg Sodium, 10g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 3g Sugars, 0g Added Sugars, 5g Protein

Grilled Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

These grilled stuffed chiles are a delicious way to take advantage of the Hatch Chile Season!

Check out the video recipe here!

Check out our weekly ad here!

Grilled Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

Prep: 20 minutes • Grill: 5 minutes • Serves: 8

1            tablespoon olive oil

1            garlic clove, minced

¼           cup panko breadcrumbs

¼           cup raw unsalted pepitas

1            tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

½           teaspoon ancho chili powder

1            green onion, thinly sliced

½           cup cream cheese, softened

1/3       cup shredded Cheddar cheese

¼           cup fresh or frozen corn kernels

3            tablespoons chèvre

2            tablespoons fresh lime juice

4            large or 8 small Anaheim or Hatch chile peppers, halved lengthwise and seeded

1. Prepare outdoor grill for direct grilling over medium-high heat. In large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat; add garlic, breadcrumbs and pepitas, and cook 2 minutes or until lightly toasted. Remove from heat; stir in cilantro and chili powder.

2. In small bowl, stir onion, cream cheese, Cheddar cheese, corn, chèvre and lime juice; transfer to small zip-top plastic bag and snip off bottom corner of bag. Fill pepper halves with cheese mixture; sprinkle with pepita mixture.

3. Place peppers, skin side down, on hot grill rack; cover and cook 5 minutes or until grill marks appear and cheese melts.

Approximate nutritional values per serving: 152 Calories, 11g Fat (5g Saturated), 23mg Cholesterol, 102mg Sodium, 10g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 3g Sugars, 0g Added Sugars, 5g Protein

Grilled Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

These grilled stuffed chiles are a delicious way to take advantage of the Hatch Chile Season!

Check out the video recipe here!

Check out our weekly ad here!h

Grilled Stuffed Anaheim Peppers

Prep: 20 minutes • Grill: 5 minutes • Serves: 8

1            tablespoon olive oil

1            garlic clove, minced

¼           cup panko breadcrumbs

¼           cup raw unsalted pepitas

1            tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

½           teaspoon ancho chili powder

1            green onion, thinly sliced

½           cup cream cheese, softened

1/3       cup shredded Cheddar cheese

¼           cup fresh or frozen corn kernels

3            tablespoons chèvre

2            tablespoons fresh lime juice

4            large or 8 small Anaheim or Hatch chile peppers, halved lengthwise and seeded

1. Prepare outdoor grill for direct grilling over medium-high heat. In large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat; add garlic, breadcrumbs and pepitas, and cook 2 minutes or until lightly toasted. Remove from heat; stir in cilantro and chili powder.

2. In small bowl, stir onion, cream cheese, Cheddar cheese, corn, chèvre and lime juice; transfer to small zip-top plastic bag and snip off bottom corner of bag. Fill pepper halves with cheese mixture; sprinkle with pepita mixture.

3. Place peppers, skin side down, on hot grill rack; cover and cook 5 minutes or until grill marks appear and cheese melts.

Approximate nutritional values per serving: 152 Calories, 11g Fat (5g Saturated), 23mg Cholesterol, 102mg Sodium, 10g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 3g Sugars, 0g Added Sugars, 5g Protein

Birchberry Bistro Curry Chicken Salad

Think outside the box and try this curry chicken salad for your weekly meal prep. Pick up a rotisserie chicken from Birchberry Bistro and throw in the tangy flavor of cranberries and the crunchy sweetness of pecans for the perfect exotic meal.

With Birchberry Bistro you get an uncompromising dedication to quality and a commitment to great taste. Bringing you all-natural chicken that contains all of what you want, and nothing you don’t. Made with no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives we guarantee you’ll bring home unrivaled flavor, freshness, and quality you deserve.

Watch for in-store and online tips and tricks on how to make the most of your rotisserie chicken. Experience freshness and flavor like never before!

Grilled Steak and vegetables

T-Bone Steak with Chimichurri Sauce

Steak and vegetables on a grill

As Summer is winding down, take advantage of all the grilling weather you have left to make the king of all steak, the T-bone.

Check out the video recipe here!

Check out our weekly ad here!

Grilled T-Bone Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce

Prep: 15 minutes plus standing • Grill: 10 minutes • Serves: 6

Chimichurri Sauce

4          garlic cloves

2          green onions, coarsely chopped

¼         cup packed fresh cilantro leaves

¼         cup packed fresh Italian parsley leaves

¼         cup white wine vinegar

1          teaspoon dried oregano leaves

¾         teaspoon kosher salt

½         teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

¼         teaspoon ground red pepper

¾         cup extra virgin olive oil

Steaks

2          T-Bone steaks (about 1 pound each)

1          tablespoon olive oil

1½       teaspoons favorite steak seasoning

1. Prepare Chimichurri Sauce: In food processor with knife blade attached or blender, purée garlic, onions, cilantro, parsley, vinegar, oregano, salt, black pepper and red pepper; with processor running, slowly pour oil through feed tube and purée until emulsified.

2. Prepare Steaks: Prepare outdoor charcoal grill for direct grilling. Let steaks stand 30 minutes at room temperature. Brush steaks with oil and sprinkle with steak seasoning.

3. Once grill temperature reaches 450°, place steaks on hot grill rack; cook, uncovered, 10 minutes or until internal temperature of steaks reaches 135°, turning once.

4. Transfer steaks to cutting board; tent with aluminum foil and let stand 10 minutes before slicing. (Internal temperature of steak will rise to 145° upon standing for medium-rare.) Slice steaks across the grain and serve with Chimichurri Sauce.

Approximate nutritional values per serving: 548 Calories, 50g Fat (12g Saturated), 79mg Cholesterol, 611mg Sodium, 2g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 24g Protein

Chef Tips

Letting the steaks stand at room temperature up to 1 hour before cooking results in even cooking, and tender, juicier steaks.

To prepare a charcoal grill for direct grilling, remove the top grate from the charcoal grill. Place coals in a chimney starter. Spark the coals and let the coals burn until they are covered with a thick layer of gray ash. Spread the coals onto the bottom grate. If the grill does not have a built-in thermometer, attach an oven thermometer to the top grill grate, replace the top grate and close the grill.

To create crosshatch marks on steaks, turn the steaks a quarter turn halfway through the grilling time on each side of steaks during first 8 minutes.

Grilled Steak and vegetables

T-Bone Steak with Chimchurri Sauce

Steak and vegetables on a grill

As Summer is winding down, take advantage of all the grilling weather you have left to make the king of all steak, the T-bone.

Check out the video recipe here!

Check out our weekly ad here!

Grilled T-Bone Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce

Prep: 15 minutes plus standing • Grill: 10 minutes • Serves: 6

Chimichurri Sauce

4          garlic cloves

2          green onions, coarsely chopped

¼         cup packed fresh cilantro leaves

¼         cup packed fresh Italian parsley leaves

¼         cup white wine vinegar

1          teaspoon dried oregano leaves

¾         teaspoon kosher salt

½         teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

¼         teaspoon ground red pepper

¾         cup extra virgin olive oil

Steaks

2          T-Bone steaks (about 1 pound each)

1          tablespoon olive oil

1½       teaspoons favorite steak seasoning

1. Prepare Chimichurri Sauce: In food processor with knife blade attached or blender, purée garlic, onions, cilantro, parsley, vinegar, oregano, salt, black pepper and red pepper; with processor running, slowly pour oil through feed tube and purée until emulsified.

2. Prepare Steaks: Prepare outdoor charcoal grill for direct grilling. Let steaks stand 30 minutes at room temperature. Brush steaks with oil and sprinkle with steak seasoning.

3. Once grill temperature reaches 450°, place steaks on hot grill rack; cook, uncovered, 10 minutes or until internal temperature of steaks reaches 135°, turning once.

4. Transfer steaks to cutting board; tent with aluminum foil and let stand 10 minutes before slicing. (Internal temperature of steak will rise to 145° upon standing for medium-rare.) Slice steaks across the grain and serve with Chimichurri Sauce.

Approximate nutritional values per serving: 548 Calories, 50g Fat (12g Saturated), 79mg Cholesterol, 611mg Sodium, 2g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 24g Protein

Chef Tips

Letting the steaks stand at room temperature up to 1 hour before cooking results in even cooking, and tender, juicier steaks.

To prepare a charcoal grill for direct grilling, remove the top grate from the charcoal grill. Place coals in a chimney starter. Spark the coals and let the coals burn until they are covered with a thick layer of gray ash. Spread the coals onto the bottom grate. If the grill does not have a built-in thermometer, attach an oven thermometer to the top grill grate, replace the top grate and close the grill.

To create crosshatch marks on steaks, turn the steaks a quarter turn halfway through the grilling time on each side of steaks during first 8 minutes.