Tag Archives: Pumpkins

Fall Festival

Fall is famous for decorated porches and we know you want to impress your visitors so we have worked with our local growers to bring you a large selection of pumpkins, squash and gourds.

Name Description Photo
Apple Gourds This unique gourd has a nearly perfect apple shape. They are most often used in crafts and fall displays and can be painted red or made into birdhouses. apple-gourds-smaller
Apprentice Mini Pumpkin The apprentice mini pumpkin is not quite a full-sized pumpkin which makes it great for crafters and school classrooms. mini-pumpkin-smaller
Australian Blue Squash Australian Blue Squash is a great treat from regular green and yellow squashes. This squash is quite large with a grayish blue, almost forest green exterior. The interior is a bright and tender orange, pumpkin tasting flesh. austrailian-blue-smaller
Australian Green Squash The Australian Green Squash is dark green with light colored dots. It also has small patches and faint stripes. The flesh is tender and delicious so perfect for baking. austrailian-green-smaller
Big Mac Pumpkins Big Mac pumpkins are extremely large, weighing anywhere between fifty and two hundred pounds. Big Mac pumpkins are not often used for cooking or baking due to their size the flesh becomes dry and fibrous. Most commonly the Big Mac pumpkin is used as a carving pumpkin. Single pumpkin isolated on white
Birdhouse Gourds Birdhouse or bottle gourds are one of the thick-skinned gourds that are mainly used for crafts or decoration. Gourd birdhouses are attractive to many species of birds including wrens, chickadees, swallows, bluebirds, titmice, and nuthatches. Gorgeous Gourds
Blue Pumpkin Blue pumpkins aren’t sad. They’re supposed to be blue. These pumpkins are great for decorative usage and can be carved into blue Jack-O-Lanterns. They can also be used for baking; just peel and cut into pieces before baking. blue-pumpkin-smaller
Cinderella Pumpkins Cinderella Pumpkins feature an exotic blue color and an almost square appearance with deep ribbing. The inside has a deep orange, sweet flesh that can be used for pies, soup, and gourmet culinary delights.  Pumpkin - Clipping Path
Corn Stalks Dried Corn stalks are the perfect fall decorations. They are great for displaying on your porch with pumpkins and gourds. Rows of corn from the ground up
Cushaw Squash The green-striped Cushaw is technically a winter squash though it also produces a spring harvest. It has a tender, pale orange or yellow flesh and is most often pureed and used for baking. It has a very mild flavor that can be overpowered if not careful.  cushaw-smaller
Jack-be-little Pumpkins These pumpkins can be orange or white, and are great for kids. Use them to decorate or they can be baked. Roasting with a little brown sugar, cinnamon and butter is a popular form of preparing these little gems. Decorative pumpkins, Jack-Be-Little Orange, Sugar Pumpkin and Jack-Be-Little White isolated on a white background. These gourds are ornamental for decorating Fall Holidays like Halloween and Thanksgiving
Knucklehead pumpkins Knucklehead pumpkins are bright to deep orange in color and covered in varying amounts of warts, scabs or bumps.  Similar to other varieties of pumpkins, Knuckleheads, have a hard, vertically ridged, thick rind and have many culinary and decorative uses.  knucklehead-pumpkin-smaller
Local Pumpkins These pumpkins are perfect for carving a scary Jack-O-Lantern. More info to add when variety is known.  pumpkin-smaller
One Too Many Squash This well named, unique variety has pale red veins which become a darker red with time, giving it an unusual and attractive bloodshot-eye appearance. They are great for decorative use, carving, or making tasty pumpkin pies.  one-too-many-smaller
Ornamental Gourds Ornamental gourds are decorative on their own as natural birdhouses or in craft projects. The oddly-shaped colorful gourds often seen in autumn decorations and can be dried and saved for future years.  ornamental-gourds-smaller
Sweet Lightning Pumpkins This unique white ornamental mini pumpkin features orange or green stripes.  These little treasures are fun to decorate with and great for kids.  sweet-lightning-smaller
Red Warty Thing Squash Aptly named, this Red Warty Thing looks like an overgrown ornamental gourd. But don’t be fooled by its peculiar looks; not only is it a super fall decoration, the stringless, fine-grained flesh is of excellent eating quality. Pumpkin With Warts
Sugar Pie Pumpkins Sugar Pie pumpkins have very smooth textured, bright orange flesh. They are most often used in baking and have the finest flavor for making mouthwatering pies.  mini-pumpkin-smaller
Swan Gourds This gourd is dark green with cream flecks and is shaped just like a swan with a long, elegant neck. With their graceful form and alluring color, they are naturally ornamental and most often used as décor.  swan-gourd-smaller
Turk Turban Squash These come in bizarre shapes with extravagant coloration that vary from bright orange, to green or white. It has golden-yellow flesh and its taste is reminiscent to hazelnut. It is popular for centerpieces but can be sliced and hollowed to be filled with soup.  turk-turbon-smaller
Uncle Fester Squash This pink to orange Pumpkin has markings that grow to look like peanuts. You may not want to take it out to the ball park, but it will fit in nicely when decorating for fall. It can also be used for baking, just peel and cut it into pieces before baking.  uncle-fester-smaller
White Ghost Pumpkins This pumpkin has a white skin and white flesh. It’s not good for eating, but perfect for a Jack-O-Lantern.  white-pumpkin-smaller

Stop by our Fall Festival today and pick up your favorite pumpkins, squash and gourds.

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Baking with Pumpkins

Baking With Pumpkins

As a member of the gourd family, pumpkins have a variety of uses.  The most popular use is of course the carving of Jack-O-Lanterns; however, there are many other things that a pumpkin can be incorporated into.  We’ve given you some fun cooking and recipe ideas to make sure your fall season is unforgettable!

pumpkin

One thing to understand is which pumpkin to use for specific things.

For Pies & Purees

  • Sugar Pie Pumpkins
  • Cinderella Pumpkins

These pumpkins are sweet and have a less dense skin that allows easy baking.  You won’t be disappointed in the taste!  For step-by-step instructions on how to make your own puree visit Allrecipes.com

Mini Pumpkin Pies

Everyone loves pumpkin pie! With these simple Mini Pumpkin Pies your whole family can enjoy their own treat.

Pumpkin Crumble

Pumpkin crumble is sort of a pumpkin pie and a pumpkin cake mix. It’s so delicious and simple and a great dessert replacement if you don’t want to take the time to bake a pie.

Pumpkin Brownies

Put a scrumptious fall twist on an all-time favorite treat with these perfect brownies.

Count us in!  For those chilly days, cozy up by the fireplace and have a slice of this delicious dessert.  The fall is great for many reasons, but the flavors are our favorite. 

Pumpkin Oat Chocolate Chip Cookies

Pumpkin. Oats. Chocolate Chips. You can’t go wrong with those ingredients in this delicious fall treat.

Pumpkin White Chocolate Chip Cookies

Your favorite dessert with a new twist!

Happy Fall!

 

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Fall Pumpkins: Get Some to Carve and Some to Eat!

I love the changing leaves and crisp evenings that come every October. They conjure nostalgic memories of childhood Halloweens, tromping down streets, friends in tow, seeking ghoulish delights through a neighborhood transformed into a macabre wonderland. Even as an adult, I can still feel the magic of those nights spent trick-or-treating and everything leading up to it – the costume shopping, scary movie watching, and let’s not forget the pumpkin carving.

As the oldest child, carving pumpkins not only meant preparing and cutting my own pumpkin but also the pumpkin we’d eat on Halloween night. In my family, it was a tradition to eat dinner in a pumpkin – a casserole baked and served inside a pumpkin – at a special Halloween dinner. The casserole was always delicious, subtly flavored by the sweet pumpkin it was baked in. We also scraped out the pumpkin flesh, which likewise benefited from the rich casserole sauce, and ate it.

Too often, we regard pumpkins as only something to be carved or purchased in a can, mixed with sugar, and then baked into a pie. Pumpkins are an extremely diverse vegetable, however, and can be incorporated into a variety of dishes, both savory and sweet. Like other winter squash, pumpkin flesh is a good source of potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. The seeds, rich in heart-healthy unsaturated fats, fiber, protein, potassium, and magnesium, are also a nutritional powerhouse. Whether preparing it yourself or taking it from a can, here are a few ideas of ways to harness the health benefits of pumpkins this fall and winter:

  • Like my childhood dinners in a pumpkin, casseroles, chili, or rice can all be baked inside a pumpkin. Serve family style in one large pumpkin or portion into small, individual pumpkins.
  • Don’t toss those seeds when you clean your pumpkin! Baked and flavored, they taste great on salads, in granola, or eaten plain.
  • Make breads, pancakes, muffins, cookies, or other baked dishes. Look for recipes that don’t use a lot of added sugar.
  • Substitute pumpkin for some of the potato in mashed potatoes. The pumpkin will add exciting color and a nice boost of vitamin A.
  • Like butternut squash, pumpkin makes a flavorful base to a soup. Just what you need to warm up on a cold evening.
  • Although native to the Americas, pumpkin has made its way into many ethnic cuisines. Thai and Indian pumpkin curries are some of my favorites.
  • Pumpkin can also put a seasonal spin on Italian or Mexican dishes. Try a pasta sauce or salsa made from pumpkin.
  • Puddings can be made healthier and tastier by adding pumpkin. Not only does the pumpkin replace the butter, you can also cut back on the sugar because of the sweet pumpkin flavor.

Happy pumpkin eating,
Ron

Fall Pumpkins: Get Some to carve and Some to Eat!

I love the changing leaves and crisp evenings that come every October. They conjure nostalgic memories of childhood Halloweens, tromping down streets, friends in tow, seeking ghoulish delights through a neighborhood transformed into a macabre wonderland. Even as an adult, I can still feel the magic of those nights spent trick-or-treating and everything leading up to it – the costume shopping, scary movie watching, and let’s not forget the pumpkin carving.

As the oldest child, carving pumpkins not only meant preparing and cutting my own pumpkin but also the pumpkin we’d eat on Halloween night. In my family, it was a tradition to eat dinner in a pumpkin – a casserole baked and served inside a pumpkin – at a special Halloween dinner. The casserole was always delicious, subtly flavored by the sweet pumpkin it was baked in. We also scraped out the pumpkin flesh, which likewise benefited from the rich casserole sauce, and ate it.

Too often, we regard pumpkins as only something to be carved or purchased in a can, mixed with sugar, and then baked into a pie. Pumpkins are an extremely diverse vegetable, however, and can be incorporated into a variety of dishes, both savory and sweet. Like other winter squash, pumpkin flesh is a good source of potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. The seeds, rich in heart-healthy unsaturated fats, fiber, protein, potassium, and magnesium, are also a nutritional powerhouse. Whether preparing it yourself or taking it from a can, here are a few ideas of ways to harness the health benefits of pumpkins this fall and winter:

  • Like my childhood dinners in a pumpkin, casseroles, chili, or rice can all be baked inside a pumpkin. Serve family style in one large pumpkin or portion into small, individual pumpkins.
  • Don’t toss those seeds when you clean your pumpkin! Baked and flavored, they taste great on salads, in granola, or eaten plain.
  • Make breads, pancakes, muffins, cookies, or other baked dishes. Look for recipes that don’t use a lot of added sugar.
  • Substitute pumpkin for some of the potato in mashed potatoes. The pumpkin will add exciting color and a nice boost of vitamin A.
  • Like butternut squash, pumpkin makes a flavorful base to a soup. Just what you need to warm up on a cold evening.
  • Although native to the Americas, pumpkin has made its way into many ethnic cuisines. Thai and Indian pumpkin curries are some of my favorites.
  • Pumpkin can also put a seasonal spin on Italian or Mexican dishes. Try a pasta sauce or salsa made from pumpkin.
  • Puddings can be made healthier and tastier by adding pumpkin. Not only does the pumpkin replace the butter, you can also cut back on the sugar because of the sweet pumpkin flavor.

Happy pumpkin eating,
Ron

Fun with pumpkins – no carving required

It’s officially fall which means pumpkin everything! We all look forward to the fun fall tradition of carving pumpkins. We have all done the carving and scooping out pumpkin seeds. We have all tried our hand at decorating the pumpkin with glitter, paint, fabric and much more. This year try a fresher take on pumpkin decorating. Grab some fresh produce from your refrigerator and start creating a produce pumpkin patch. Stop by our produce department to get beets, tomatoes, lettuce, ginger, apples and more to make funny fresh pumpkin faces.

Need some ideas to create your produce pumpkin? Try some of these suggestions.

  • Hair: lettuce, ginger, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cilantro
  • Eyes: mushrooms, tomatoes, broccoli, strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries
  • Nose: ginger, mushrooms, tomatoes, radish, squash, garlic clove
  • Mouth: apples, beets, peppers, carrots, onions