ACE Red Hot Buys

Take advantage of our Red Hot Buys through September 30. Buy two, get one free air filters, insect killer and save on bird food and RV antifreeze. Ace Rewards members save on lawn care including winterizer, lawn food and EZ seed. Visit our locations in Draper, Murray, Olympus Hills and Sandy.

Ten Tailgating Tips

Here are ten tailgating tips to make you a tailgating champ. Then check out our awesome sales on our weekly ad to save big for your tailgates.

  1. Foods that can be eaten with your hands work best for tailgating. Think chicken, tacos, hamburgers, pulled-pork sandwiches, brats, kebabs, burritos . . . the list could go on and on. Regardless, simple, delicious foods allow you to focus on fun and be less concerned with complicated recipes.
  2. If you tailgate often, develop a checklist and laminate it. (Lamination will protect it from rain, snow, beverages and tears of opposing fans.) Or, use one of many checklist apps to ensure you never forget a much-needed item during your parking-lot party.
  3. You’re about to sit in a potentially sun-filled stadium packed with people on a chair that may or may not be comfortable. Sit in style pre game by packing portable seating and some shade. Camp chairs come in all shapes and sizes and most fit easily in your trunk. Canopies are easy to set up and simple to store. Plus, you can almost certainly find them in your team colors.
  4. Perform pre-game prep. Chop, slice, and assemble whatever you can beforehand. Store all of your food in waterproof, plastic bags or disposable plasticware. Both allow for maximum storage usage in your coolers. The more you pack in disposable containers, the less you’ll have to lug home or clean. When possible, use several smaller containers, rather than one large one, so you can take only as much as you need out of the cooler and keep the rest cold.
  5. Make it portable. Assemble materials in containers that are easy to carry. Smart tailgaters gather items in containers like toolboxes or storage bins. Condiments and utensils can be stored in empty six-pack containers. Coolers are important. Use at least two—one for food, one for drinks.
  6. Food safety is important, especially outside. Have a cold food cooler and a drink cooler. Drink coolers will be opened more frequently, so separate coolers allow food to stay cold longer.
  7. Instead of using bags of ice, use frozen water bottles. The bottles will make less mess in the cooler and you’ll have perfectly chilled drinks as they thaw.
  8. Keep it hot. When food needs to be kept warm, turn a cooler into a hotbox. Warm bricks in the oven, wrap them in foil and place in a cooler lined with wet towels. This will keep your food warm for 2-3 hours.
  9. Keep it short. Don’t let food sit out for more than two hours. If it’s really hot outside, (over 90 degrees) don’t let food sit out for more than an hour.
  10. Don’t hesitate to rely on your teammates. Our store can be an important part of your tailgating tribe. With meat and cheese trays, fresh-cut fruit and veggies, deliciously portable desserts and more, we have all the solutions you need to celebrate another successful season.

Ten Tailgating Tips

Here are ten tailgating tips to make you a tailgating champ.

  1. Foods that can be eaten with your hands work best for tailgating. Think chicken, tacos, hamburgers, pulled-pork sandwiches, brats, kebabs, burritos . . . the list could go on and on. Regardless, simple, delicious foods allow you to focus on fun and be less concerned with complicated recipes.
  2. If you tailgate often, develop a checklist and laminate it. (Lamination will protect it from rain, snow, beverages and tears of opposing fans.) Or, use one of many checklist apps to ensure you never forget a much-needed item during your parking-lot party.
  3. You’re about to sit in a potentially sun-filled stadium packed with people on a chair that may or may not be comfortable. Sit in style pre game by packing portable seating and some shade. Camp chairs come in all shapes and sizes and most fit easily in your trunk. Canopies are easy to set up and simple to store. Plus, you can almost certainly find them in your team colors.
  4. Perform pre-game prep. Chop, slice, and assemble whatever you can beforehand. Store all of your food in waterproof, plastic bags or disposable plasticware. Both allow for maximum storage usage in your coolers. The more you pack in disposable containers, the less you’ll have to lug home or clean. When possible, use several smaller containers, rather than one large one, so you can take only as much as you need out of the cooler and keep the rest cold.
  5. Make it portable. Assemble materials in containers that are easy to carry. Smart tailgaters gather items in containers like toolboxes or storage bins. Condiments and utensils can be stored in empty six-pack containers. Coolers are important. Use at least two—one for food, one for drinks.
  6. Food safety is important, especially outside. Have a cold food cooler and a drink cooler. Drink coolers will be opened more frequently, so separate coolers allow food to stay cold longer.
  7. Instead of using bags of ice, use frozen water bottles. The bottles will make less mess in the cooler and you’ll have perfectly chilled drinks as they thaw.
  8. Keep it hot. When food needs to be kept warm, turn a cooler into a hotbox. Warm bricks in the oven, wrap them in foil and place in a cooler lined with wet towels. This will keep your food warm for 2-3 hours.
  9. Keep it short. Don’t let food sit out for more than two hours. If it’s really hot outside, (over 90 degrees) don’t let food sit out for more than an hour.
  10. Don’t hesitate to rely on your teammates. Our store can be an important part of your tailgating tribe. With meat and cheese trays, fresh-cut fruit and veggies, deliciously portable desserts and more, we have all the solutions you need to celebrate another successful season.

National Family Meals Month

Did you know September is National Family Meals Month? We know juggling new school routines and fall activities makes it difficult to have more meals at home. Take the pledge and commit to having one more meal at home during the week. You can find easy, healthy mealtime solutions in nearly every aisle in our store.

Ask our team members for help!

Check out our weekly deals to view family friendly meal solutions.

National Family Meals Month

Did you know September is National Family Meals Month? We know juggling new school routines and fall activities makes it difficult to have more meals at home. Take the pledge and commit to having one more meal at home during the week. You can find easy, healthy mealtime solutions in nearly every aisle in our store.

Ask our team members for help!

Check out our weekly deals to view family friendly meal solutions.

It’s Emergency Preparedness Month- A Good Time to Create an Emergency Checklist!

It’s Emergency Preparedness Month—A Good Time to Create an Emergency Checklist!

 

Eventually, most families will face some kind of an emergency situation—whether it’s an earthquake, an exceptionally bad storm, a fire, or flooding—the odds are that at some point, we will all need to be prepared for some type of a serious crisis. That’s when an emergency checklist becomes so important. A simple list, thought out well in advance, can provide the direction and information your family will need in any emergency. Yet surprisingly, few families take the time to make one, leaving them vulnerable and ill-prepared if the worst happens.

 

An effective emergency checklist includes everything your family needs to know, or do, in case of an emergency. It’s the ‘go-to’ item that is easy to make and may actually save lives in a crisis situation. While emergency checklists can become quite extensive, the following recommendations reflect the minimum content that a thorough, sound checklist should include:

 

  • Establish your family’s meeting place(s). You should establish and document at least two meeting places: one within your neighborhood to use in case of a fire or other emergency that occurs in your immediate vicinity; and secondly, a place outside your neighborhood where you can meet should your home and neighborhood become inaccessible.
  • Make a home evacuation plan. In case of a fire, everyone should be aware of the fastest and safest ways to evacuate your home from all rooms and all floors. You should then all meet in your predetermined neighborhood meeting location. It’s a good idea to practice the evacuation a few times each year.
  • List nearby water sources. Jot down names and addresses (or better yet, maps) of nearby lakes, streams, rivers, or springs that can be used as potential water sources. Be sure to include water treatment tablets or drops in your emergency kit.
  • Create an emergency contact phone list. This should include numbers for all of your family’s cell phones, closest neighbors, doctors and vet’s, and your workplace. It should also include at least one out of state family member or friend’s number in case your family has been forced to evacuate separately.
  • Write down your medications. It’s critical to compile a list of medications and allergies that are applicable to each family member. If possible, store medications in a location that makes it easy to quickly grab critical medications in the event of an evacuation.
  • Identify and document a go-to social media platform. Your entire family, extended family, and close friends should know and agree to contact each other via a specific social media platform in the event of a disaster. Consider listing one or two specific family members’ accounts as the go-to accounts for information, updates, and instructions.
  • Download and notate emergency apps. You should also discuss which apps each of you will have downloaded and installed on your cell phones, like FEMA or Life360. FEMA will keep you posted on the status of earthquakes, floods, hurricanes and the like, while an app like Life360 will allow you to set up your own family’s private network. There are lots of options available, so discuss which is best for your family and then make sure everyone has it and knows how to use it.
  • Assign responsibility for the bug-out kit. Compile and store your emergency bug-out kit in an easy to get to place and then assign one person (usually a parent) with the responsibility of taking it to your meeting place. Don’t forget to include plenty of food, water (and/or water treatment tablets), first aid and hygiene supplies, medications, a fire or power source, tools, shelter, important documents, and of course your checklist.
  • Assign a pet’s buddy. Assign one or more family members with the task of getting your pets out of danger and bringing them to your family meeting site. The pet buddy should grab the pet food bug-out kit, prepared in advance, that includes not only pet food but a bowl to drink water from, medications, and a list of allergies that emergency responders should be aware of. It’s a good idea to include a pet toy to help ease their anxiety, and, if pet carriers are needed, be sure to store them in an easy-to-grab location.

 

Holding a family meeting and compiling your emergency checklist will provide everyone with the peace of mind that come with emergency preparedness. How well your family responds to a crisis may depend on how well they understand and utilize your emergency checklist. Take the first step in family safety preparation by creating your own emergency checklist today.

 

______

 

Macey’s has teamed with Augason Farms to offer emergency food supplies and long term food storage to our valued customers for good reason. They’ve been in the business since 1972 and guarantee their products for great taste and superior quality. Maintaining a supply of Augason Farms products in your home is ideal not only for your emergency food supply but for everyday use as well. With Macey’s and Augason Farms, preparedness is simple and affordable!